A story that discusses the issues around "cheap mail" -- how to bring e-mail to the masses without major costs.

[M]any companies are discovering that corporate e-mail systems don't have to be expensive to be effective. In many cases, simple, stripped-down mail servers fit the bill quite nicely. But that doesn't mean you should rip out your Exchange or Domino servers tomorrow. ...

ManuLife Financial, a Canadian financial services company with extensive business in Asia, used Lotus Workplace Messaging to deliver Web-based e-mail to 3,600 independent insurance agents in Japan. Because most of those agents are not computer savvy, the company wanted an easy-to-use solution. ...

"The business design we have, which is based on industry standards, leverages the industry's investment, which is why we can get the licensing costs down," says Ambuj Goyal, general manager of IBM's Lotus Software. In other words: With millions of developers working on Java applications, IBM doesn't have to devote its own resources to building a robust platform from scratch. IBM's goal is to have all of its messaging and collaboration products migrate to an open platform over time, says Goyal, while preserving support for current Notes clients.
More >

Post a Comment