From time to time, I hear complaints about how difficult IBM makes it for someone to buy Lotus Notes.  While it is true that Passport Advantage, IBM's volume licensing program, has many dimensions and nuances, they tend to be more relevant in large, multi-site, multi-national companies.  If you want to buy just one copy of Lotus Notes -- say, for example, to run Eric Mack's eProductivity application -- it's all pretty straight-forward.  Based on Eric's blog entry on this very topic, I decided I'd walk through the process and see if it was difficult or easy to buy Lotus Notes online.

First, finding this on IBM's website isn't all that tough.  I went to Google and typed in "buy Lotus Notes".

Image:Actually, it’s easy to buy Lotus Notes

Clicking through on that page, I am presented with a few options on how to buy Notes.  Admittedly, it's not "click here to pay with paypal", but the options are straightforward. Maybe too many, but I have ways to get help, too.

Image:Actually, it’s easy to buy Lotus Notes
"buy online" -- those words make sense to me.  Clicking on that leads to a page in IBM's catalog that outlines my licensing options.  It needs some updating to cover Notes 8.5, and the reference to the old SAP offering needs to be removed, but the page is clear on what I can do.  

Image:Actually, it’s easy to buy Lotus Notes

One more click and I'm in a shopping cart -- specifying which Notes license I want to buy.

Image:Actually, it’s easy to buy Lotus Notes

There are also options to buy Domino or Domino Express:

Image:Actually, it’s easy to buy Lotus Notes

Another click from here and I can specify desired quantity, then begin the check-out process.  From here, it's a pretty standard e-commerce transaction -- billing address, credit card, and download away!

I'm sure there are criticisms, and I realize this process is not available in every country.  For the end-user, or a small business, though, this is a pretty simple, easy way to buy Notes and Domino.

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