I've been a little quiet the last few weeks -- well the last month -- because of a fairly intense travel schedule, the excitement of our beta release of LotusLive Notes, and some changes in my organization within IBM Lotus.  For the first time in 10+ years as a people manager, one of my staff left IBM for a new opportunity, and his last day was today.

It's not appropriate on the blog to go into details of who or why or where.  I do feel good that this individual chose to continue their career in product management -- I'd like to think that they learned and grew from being a part of my team.  It's just so unusual for me to be looking at departure checklists and paperwork and collecting badges, rather than writing organizational announcements and doing departmental transfers.

A lot of people say they don't enjoy managing other people, but for me it's one of the most enjoyable parts of my job.  Just about every person who has been on my team has moved up in their career.  I learn a ton from having great people work for me, and while we do work incredibly hard, we are all in this for the experiences and growth.  My personal style is one where I socialize, discuss, debate, challenge, and consider all inputs, and having talented contributors as part of the team effort all make that work.

There have been a lot of lessons about teaming in the last few weeks.  I've had offers to help out in transition from several corners of the organization, and resumes and recommendations for potential candidates have been flowing in.  My superiors have been quick to do the right things to work towards replacements.  I'm interviewing, which I always enjoy.

I've probably said this on the blog before, but the best thing about being in product management is that there is a virtually limitless scope to the kinds of activities you can get involved with surrounding your product.  The worst thing about being in product management is that there is a virtually limitless scope to the kinds of activities you can get involved in with surrounding your product.  Every day comes down to triage, making smart decisions about effectiveness and impact, and remaining focused on your business.  It's way more than the "four P's" I learned in business school, more than understanding the technology, and more than setting vision.  And on this, my third tour through product management for Notes, it's more fun than ever.  Can't wait to be talking about the next additions to this team and our next accomplishments.

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